Best  free  travel apps  FOR visiting CHINA     

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     Preparing for your trip can be an exciting and overwhelming time, so in the run up to your adventure here are some app's that will help your travels from learning the language to finding the best restaurants around.     Wechat    This is an obvious one for China as it's one of the biggest platforms being used - a reported 768 million users are active on Wechat every day! It combines features from Facebook, Twitter, Whatsapp so you can add photos, live streams, text and call people on it. Making friends and contacts in China couldn't be easier for communication! You can even download Wechat onto your laptop or Ipad, so you're never without it.      

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Photo by cadenas.de  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


      Learning the Language     Pleco   Combing the Chinese dictionary and the Oxford English dictionary it's not surprising that Pleco is one of the best translation apps for learning Mandarin! Even the basic free version of Pleco can help you translate and learn how to draw characters whilst aiding your handwriting in Mandarin too. It also includes flashcards to speed up your learning and contains audio, so you can hear from native Mandarin speakers how to accurately pronounce sentences and words.    Google Translate        

  

  	

  		 

  			 

  				 
               
  					 

  					 
             

  				 

  			 

        

  		 

  	

  


     A great way to learn the language and help yourself out of tricky situations is the trusted Google Translate. It's easy to use through typing in the words you want to say in English to be translated, or you can even take photographs of words and signs you don't understand and voila! It's translated. The translations might not always be identical, but it'll definitely help if you're out shopping or want to choose some food from a menu. You can also download Mandarin onto your phone so you don't need to be on the internet to use it all the time, saving yourself some data.       ChineseSkills - Learn Mandarin Chinese       

  

  	

  		 

  			 

  				 
               
  					 

  					 
             

  				 

  			 

        

  		 

  	

  


     Learning a language doesn't have to just be classes and lessons. Being immersed into the Chinese lifestyle is a huge step into learning Mandarin, and ChineseSkills can help you learn in a fun, engaging way. Games and courses fill the free app, helping your pronunciation of characters and long term memory whilst tracking your progress. From greetings to dating and dining to tenses, it'll make your day-to-day life in China a lot easier and way more fun.       Getting Around     CityMaps2Go       

  

  	

  		 

  			 

  				 
               
  					 

  					 
             

  				 

  			 

        

  		 

  	

  


     This app is great for wherever you are in the world, and basically like a mini TripAdvisor, maps and personal guide in your pocket. The GPS on your phone accesses your location, and from there you can choose what you'd like to do and where to go. Whether you're searching for restaurants, parks, museums or nightlife, CityMaps gives you inspiration for each of your interests. It regularly shows inspiration for places you might like based on what you've already searched with articles and reviews from like minded travellers too. Like Google Translate, you can download the map of your destination before you travel, so as soon as you get there even if you don't have data you can be searching for adventure.        Around Me       

  

  	

  		 

  			 

  				 
               
  					 

  					 
             

  				 

  			 

        

  		 

  	

  


     Super quick and speedy, Around Me is great for efficiency in finding whatever you need from close by. Simply choose from the menu what you'd like to find i.e. banks, pubs, pharmacies and the app will locate all those by you and how to get to them. It'll show you restaurant menus and let you make reservations, or taxi details for your ride to classes and meeting up with your new friends.        Explore Metro     Cities in China are big. Not just big actually, huge. Thankfully, cities have very structured metro systems to get around efficiently, and even more thankfully, Explore Metro can help you navigate round the metros to navigate round the cities! Beijing, Shanghai, Shenzhen, Guangzhou and even Hong Kong are featured maps and you can download them directly onto your phone to use without data. The maps are easy to use, even telling you travel times so you know how long it'll take you to change lines or get to your destination. Handy, huh?   Useful Extras    Vegetarious       

  

  	

  		 

  			 

  				 
               
  					 

  					 
             

  				 

  			 

        

  		 

  	

  


     Vegetarian or vegan? It can be confusing in a foreign country to try and explain that you don't eat meat, or consume any animal product at all. Vegetarious is a great little app that can tell you all the vegan, vegetarian, veg-friendly restaurants around you and you can follow people nearby that have reviewed vegetarian restaurants close by for more trusted reviews.   Mentions:   These ones aren't free, but we want to mention it for any Vegan's out there.   Happy Cow   You can use it online for free, but it costs to download. Happy Cow is great for locating vegan or veg-friendly restaurants anywhere in the world, and even shows stores to buy products at it so you can purchase your home comforts in your new place.    Veganagogo   This super handy app can help translate phrases you may want to ask about what's really in your meal. So that's no more charades in public, just find what you want to ask and show! Hurray!     

  

  	

  		 

  			 

  				 
               
  					 

  					 
             

  				 

  			 

        

  		 

  	

  


      Air Quality China    It's no secret that parts of China have air pollution. Major cities can be the worst culprits and it's helpful to be able to track what's happening around you. Keeping healthy is a really important factor when abroad, so you can see the pollution levels easily when you put in your location into the app. For most people it's just another part of life in China to get used to, and as long as you're sensible about your health, when you're outside and where then it's not a problem.            

  

  	

  		 

  			 

  				 
               
  					 

  					 
             

  				 

  			 

        

  		 

  	

  


      Xe Currency   Helpful everywhere in the world, this app can convert your RMB into GBP or vice versa to see how much you're spending and what the rates are. Great for pricing up items you're considering taking home with you too!    TripIt     Holidays can be crazy confusing. What times your flight? Where do you go from there? Do you have your boarding pass? WELL, that's where TripIt comes in and flies your troubles away. Sync it with your calendar and input your travel profile to keep important information and details all in once place! You can share your itinerary and plans with your fellow travellers to keep each other up to date and there'll be no more searching for your sheets in the bottom of your bag.     Baidu     Not technically an app, but Baidu is China's answer to Google. You can find everything China related there as it's basically a mega search engine where you can find movies and tv, social networking, a dictionary and translation, maps, queries and answers and more!    VPNs   Facebook, Twitter and Google are banned in China so if you want access to your social media accounts from home to keep people posted on your adventures you'll need to download a VPN before you go. VPNs (virtual private network) create the illusion that you're surfing the web in another country and although you can get some free ones, the most reliable one (from our own staff member Jessica who lived in China for a year) is ExpressVPN. 

Get prepared for your move to China with our own run down of the top free apps you can download now! 

      端午节 ( Duānwǔjié) ' Dragon Boat Festival'     

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Crossing the finish line in Heiwai, Ronggui. (Photo: Caiguanaho)  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     In honour of the Dragon Boat Festival, celebrated on the fifth day of the fifth lunar month (May 30th 2017), here is a short excerpt from one of Qu Yuan’s most famous poems, translated by  Hugh Grigg .  離騷 ( Lí Sāo ) 'The Sorrow of Parting'  朝      發  軔   於  蒼    梧  兮,                                                                     Zhāo fā rèn yú cāngwú xī,                                                                    Taking off the brake, departing from Cangwu at dawn,   夕 餘  至  乎    縣    圃;                                                                               xī yú zhì hū xuán pǔ;                                                                                and before night falls, arriving at the Hanging Gardens;   欲   少    留  此 靈    瑣  兮,                                                                         yù shǎo liú cǐ líng sǒu xī,                                                                              I wish to stay at this gathering place of the spirits,    日 忽 忽  其 將     暮;                                                                                   rì hūhū qí jiāng mù;                                                                                    yet the sun is about to set;   吾   令    羲 和 弭  節 兮,                                                                             wú lìng Xīhé mǐ jié xī,                                                                                  I   order Xihe to slow to a trot;   望       崦   嵫 而  匆    迫;                                                                           wàng yān zī ér cōng pò;                                                                        gazing at Mt Yan and Mt Zi, yet not anxious to approach them;   路  漫   漫     其 脩   遠    兮,                                                                       lù mànmàn qí xiū yuǎn xī,                                                                          the road is boundless - cultivation so distant;   吾    將      上     下   而  求 索。                                                                   wú jiāng shàngxià ér qiúsuǒ.                                                                      I shall explore it from beginning to end.      What has Dragon Boat racing got to do with Qu Yuan?  Well, the story goes that Qu Yuan (c. 340–278 BC), poet and political advisor to King Huai of Chu, recommended that Chu ally itself with the enemy state Qi to defeat the mutual enemy state of Qin. However, in exile from Chu for allegations brought against him by corrupted ministers influencing the King, Qu Yuan hears that his beloved homeland has been defeated by Qin after King Huai did not take his advice. Upon hearing this news, he drowned himself in the Miluo river in an act of political martyrdom and in protest against political corruption.   After his drowning the locals are said to have rushed into the water in long boats, beating drums to scare evil spirits away and throwing rice wrapped in leaves into the water to prevent the fish from eating him. Another version is that they threw rice to feed Qu Yuan's spirit but it kept getting intercepted by catfish the size of dragons. So, a few years after his death, Qu Yuan appeared and told them to wrap the rice in leaves. Either way, at the Dragon Boat Festival people race long boats, eat 糭子  zòngzi  (rice dumplings wrapped in leaves), and remember Qu Yuan for his poetry and patriotism.   In recent years people have begun to suggest another reason for his committing suicide based on alternative readings of his poetry.  Usually, his prose is understood as patriotic, but some scholars suggest that it can also be understood as an expression of his love for King Huai, who exiled him before ignoring his advice. This has led to some of the Chinese LGBTQ+ community, as well as a number of scholars, interpreting Qu Yuan’s suicide as that of a jilted lover, rather than an exasperated patriot.  Regardless of the reason for which he committed suicide, he was a much-loved figure and this yearly celebration of his life, death, and poetry has left a great legacy in sport and cuisine. Over the last 30 years or so, the sport of Dragon Boat Racing has become popular around the world and the International Dragon Boat Federation support competitions and leagues everywhere. The  zòngzi  have also gained popularity as a regular snack food, sometimes plain, sometimes stuffed with sweet or savoury fillings.  Sources:   https://eastasiastudent.net/china/classical/qu-yuan-li-sao-extract/    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/the-legends-behind-the-dragon-boat-festival-135634582/    http://shanghaiist.com/2012/06/23/duanwu-festival-gay-valentines.php    https://www.idbf.org/history    http://thewoksoflife.com/2015/05/zongzi-cantonese-style/

In honour of the Dragon Boat Festival, celebrated on the fifth day of the fifth lunar month (May 30th 2017) here's the tradition and story behind the yearly celebrations.

      Chinese Language Indie-Pop and Alt-Rock     

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     ‘How can I find out more about Chinese indie-pop and alt-rock?’  It's a question I’m sure we’ve all asked ourselves at some point. Well, the answer is ‘Watercress FM’; a Chinese mash-up of LastFM, Spotify, Soundcloud, Bandcamp, Goodreads, IMDb.... Basically it is a site for finding new music, books and films. It contains content from all over the world but also, and crucial for those in search of China’s indie music scene, lots of Chinese content.     

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


     
   Anyway, this blog post is not just to alert you to the delights of the Chinese hipster scene (yes! China has hispters too! They are called the w ényì qīngnián  or 'cultured youth') but also to highlight the usefulness of music for learning Chinese, or any other language.  The sounds of Chinese are so different from those of English that it can take a while for our ears to adjust to the new sounds. As such, it is important to 'open our ears' to these new sounds from the very beginning. This is usually done in class through 'listen and repeat' exercises - how many times have you repeated 'ni hao' just trying to get the tones right?  Music provides us with a much more interesting way of doing 'listen and repeat' exercises because we tend to listen to our favourite songs on repeat anyway. The trick is finding some music in Chinese that we like, so that we find ourselves  wanting  to listen and repeat. This is where Dòubàn comes in handy!  Simply make an account and listen to some songs under the 'Chinese music' heading. When you find one you like, click the heart icon and the site's algorithms will bring you into contact with other songs you might like. You can even search for your favourite music in English (or other languages) so that every now and again a Chinese song will just pop up in amongst your regular playlist!  Here are a few of our favourites to get you started (they open in new windows - click on the green 'button' if it plays the previous song again).  1.   Carsick Cars: 中南海/Zhōngnánhǎi    2.   Queen Sea Big Shark (后海大鲨鱼/Hòuhǎi dà shāyú): 'Bling bling bling bling'    3.   Hedgehog (刺猬 Cìwei): 'Asphalt Road' (柏油公路 Bóyóu gōnglù)     If the thought of learning Mandarin makes you nervous, don't worry! Our pre-departure packages include a short introduction to learning Mandarin, plus lots of pointers on independent language learning.       

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
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	 Return to BMC Blog

If you're learning Chinese, listening to music is a great way to improve your listening and spoken skills. But how do you find songs you like? This blog post tells you how...

      Inspirational  Women of China  Today is International Women's Day! Whilst it is celebrated across the world, in China the female population, who "hold up half the sky", are appreciated with gifts, showing respect for the women who are working harder than ever to build equality outside traditional roles.   Although there are now many inspiring women in China who have broken through the "glass ceiling", we've picked a few stories and triumphs to inspire you on this celebratory day.          

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Jane Zhang at Terminator Genisys Premier. china.org.cn  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


      Jane Zhang - Popstar   After rising to fame on Chinese Talent show 'Super Girl',  Jane Zhang  is on the verge of becoming the first Chinese female pop star to break into the global pop industry. After recording multiple tracks in the U.S., Zhang was the only female Asian singer to be invited to sing vocals on the World Peace One charity single with 99 other famous voices in 2007.   Since then, Jane has continued to break through into the international pop industry by singing the theme tunes for both Terminator Genisys in 2015 with Big Sean, and for The Great Wall in 2016.      

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
          
             
                  
             
          
             
          

          
           
              Jane Zhang - Dust My Shoulders Off Video  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     Jane's ability to mix traditional Chinese pop with contemporary R'n'B in English has meant a soar in popularity globally, and her most recent debut "Dust My Shoulders Off" was not only a hit being produced by  Timbaland , but struck a chord with cultures globally through it's creative, arty video representing the music scenes through different famous paintings.              Wu Yi - Politician      

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Wu Yi - From http://trade.gov/  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     Now retired, Wu Yi was regarded as one of the most successful and powerful women in China during her years as a politician up until 2008. Graduating in Beijing with a major in oil refinery engineering, Yi worked her way up from a technician to general secretary in petrochemical engineering and technology, defying all odds and gender stereotypes.  Known as the "Iron Lady" in the Chinese media, Yi was formidable in her work and most known for her takeover as Minister for the Ministry of Health. Wu Yi never married either, another common importance for Chinese women as she worked throughout her life. In 2004, 2005 and 2007, Forbes regarded Wu Yi as the 2nd most powerful in the world before her complete retirement from politics and the public eye.            

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Guo Pei on wsj.com  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


      Guo Pei - Fashion Designer      

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Rihanna in Guo Pei in 2015. imabeautygeek.com/  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


      Guo Pei  is not only the first woman, but first born and bred Asian designer to have been invited to join the " Chambre Syndicale de la   Haute Couture " as a guest member. Inspired by "life and love", Guo's designs stand out in China with her imperialistic and luxurious designs. Guo had studied design in Beijing before working in an independently owned clothing company, and finally setting up her own brand in 1997.    Guo was known most popularly for dressing Chinese celebrities, in particular the 2008 Beijing Olympics, until one of her most lavish and unique gowns was worn by singer Rihanna at the 2015 Met Gala - propelling Guo Pei into the global design-sphere. Perfectly combining western and traditional Chinese culture into her gowns, Guo Pei became a huge success and has gone on to take part in Fashion Weeks across the globe, as well as being included in Times 100 Most Influential People 2016 breaking barriers in fashion and feminism.            

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Deng Yaping Wins  english.cri.cn/  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


      Deng Yaping - Sports Woman      Deng Yapin  is regarded as one of the greatest athletes in Chinese history, with 4 Olympic and 6 world championships to her name in table tennis - winning her first national championship at only 13 years old!      

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Yapin Receiving her PhD from Cambridge University. en.yibada.com/  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     Deng was firstly denied a place onto the Chinese national table tennis team due to her height (4''11), but her determination and talent scored her place on the team and she has since gone on to become one of the greatest female players in history, ranking top female player in the world from 1991-1998 and Chinese Sports Personality of the Century in 1999. As most sports careers are shorter in nature, Yapin retired at the age of 24 with 18 Olympic medals to her name and became part of the 2008 Beijing Olympics Committee. But that wasn't enough for Yapin, as she went on to study for her bachelors degree, followed by a masters at Nottingham University and a Phd at Cambridge University.           

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Lucy Peng speaking. @Gia Dinh  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


      Lucy Peng - Billionaire Business-woman    A former economics professor who stepped down to become a co-founder of one of the biggest e-commerce giants around, Alibaba,  Peng Lei  is a woman who made it onto Forbes 100 Most Powerful Women in the World and is a woman with experience in everything from finance to HR.   Overseeing around 35,000 employees in Alibaba, Peng worked on different employment models in HR- the department also created by herself and made innovations in mobile commerce technology. Peng became a billionaire in 2015 whilst changing to working for Ant Financials, founded again by herself to support smaller businesses with some of the biggest investors in the Chinese Industry. From a professor to a co-founder to a CEO billionaire - Peng is definitely an amazing example of female power and determination.            No matter what profession or age, all these women and many more have all broken through barriers in China and across the globe. Influential and inspiring, the dynamics between gender and equality are ever-changing and these women are just a few who prove that it is possible!     
 
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It's International Women's Day 2017! We've picked a few inspirational women in China from the past few years who've broken barriers in their professions not only as a woman in China - but in the world. 

       
 
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     In China, the Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival is the most important festival of the year, like Christmas in the UK. It is celebrated on a different date every year because the date is based on the traditional Chinese lunisolar calendar. A lunar month is two days shorter than a solar month and so, every few years an extra month is added to make up for this, hence why the date changes every year.      How is it Celebrated:    Spring festival is celebrated in several ways in China. The most important event of the Spring Festival is a giant feast. People from the North of China eat dumplings during their Spring Festival feast whereas people from the South eat glutinous rice cakes.  Family members will come from far and wide to enjoy it together. Chinese people go to many lengths to attend the Spring Festival feast with their family, with some travelling across the entire country to attend. Family members returning to their hometowns for the Chinese New Year can be described as the largest human immigration event on the planet.       
  
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
           The next way the Chinese New Year is celebrated is through the exchange of red envelopes or “hong bao”. The packets contain money for good luck for the new year. Traditionally the packets were given to unmarried young people and children by those that are already married. Nowadays red packets tend to be given from the older generation to the younger generation as a sign of good will.        Other ways Spring Festival is celebrated in China is by decorating the house with red lanterns, paper cuttings, door couplets and upside-down Fu characters. All these red decorations are displayed to bring in good luck for the new year. Red is a lucky colour in China, furthermore, the Chinese New Year monster, Nian, is said to be afraid of the colour red. He is also afraid of loud noises which is traditionally why Chinese people set off fireworks during the festival.       

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


       
  
 
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     Chinese lion dances and dragon dances:    Lion dances are a tradition in China spanning thousands of years, originally the lion was thought to be a mythical creature, with lions only being introduced to China during the Han dynasty because of the silk road. Lion dances take place during important occasions such as the Spring Festival or other big occasions as the lion is thought to be an auspicious animal in China and so brings good luck. In the South of China lion dances play an important role in bringing good fortune. Some Chinese businesspeople will even hire a lion dance troupe when launching a new product etc. to bring good luck to their business.        Dragon dances originally came about as a way of praying for rain as the dragon created rain for the thirsty animals in the Chinese zodiac story. After this a dragon dance became a ceremonial activity when worshipping the ancestors. Nowadays dragon dances usually take place at important festivals like the Chinese New Year as a symbol of wisdom, power and wealth.      
  
 
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      Animal Zodiac:     This year will be the year of the rooster so for any roosters it’s your “ben ming nian” literally your origin of life year. This is a year that will bring you bad luck because people in their ben ming nian offend the God of Age.     The Chinese zodiac years follow a twelve-year cycle, with the order being determined by the Chinese zodiac origin story below.       The Chinese Zodiac Story:      

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


      The story goes that a long time ago the Jade Emperor in China wanted to create a way of measuring time and so he declared that a race would take place. The first twelve animals to cross the river would have a year named after them.        Rat and cat, who could not swim, asked the kind ox to carry them across the river and ox agreed. However devious rat pushed cat off ox’s back and into the river and cat drowned. This is why cats do not have a year named after them, it is also said to be why cats and rats hate each other. As ox reached the finish line rat leapt from his back and crossed it first, earning him 1st place, with ox coming second.     Next to finish was tiger who used his strength to swim against the strong current and earn third place. While rabbit hopped across stepping stones and logs to arrive in fourth place.    In fifth place was the dragon, who flew across the river. The emperor asked the dragon why he did not finish first since he could fly, but the kind dragon was delayed by creating rain for thirsty animals. The emperor, impressed by his kindness, stated that the dragon’s son snake could take sixth place as a reward.    Next to arrive was horse, closely followed by rooster, monkey and goat, who had worked together to arrive to the shore by using a raft to cross the river.    Eleventh to arrive was dog, who was delayed to arrive because the rivers water was so clean that he stopped to bathe in it.    The last animal to arrive was pig, again the Emperor asked him why he arrived so late. The pig replied that he was hungry and stopped on the way to have something to eat, after this he fell asleep, eventually crossing the river in last place.         
 
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In China, the Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival is the most important festival of the year, like Christmas in the UK. It is celebrated on a different date every year because the date is based on the traditional Chinese lunisolar calendar. A lunar month is two days shorter than a solar month and so, every few years an extra month is added to make up for this, hence why the date changes every year. 

Read more about the Chinese new year here:

          In the Mood For Love   •   花樣年華     (Wong Kar-  wai   2000)               </iframe>" data-provider-name="YouTube"            Clip: Criterion Collection's  Three Reasons to watch In the Mood for Love    Two married couples, the Chans and the Chows, rent rooms from Shanghainese neighbours in   1960s   Hong Kong  . Mrs. Chan (Maggie Cheung) and Mr. Chow (Tony Leung)   begin to   suspect that their partners may be   having an affair with each   other  .        Partly out of   lon  e  liness   and partly out of curiosity,   Mr  .   Chow and   Mrs  .   Chan begin to spend more time toge  ther. Their initial curiosity turns into real affection but,   as Mrs. Chan says, ‘we will not be like them’.        The film follows the development of their feelings against an opulent   backdrop of damask wallpapers and   sultry slow motion encounters   in the corridors and alleyways of their home and   neighbourhood  , all perfectly framed and paced to the sounds of  Yumeji's Theme    by   Shigeru   Umebayashi     or     Nat King Cole’s cover   of  Quizás quizás quizás  by   Osvaldo   Farrés  .       The reserved and brooding   characters of   Mr  .   Chow and   Mrs  .   Chan   contrast   sharply   with the lively and carefree Shanghainese families   with whom they each live. This   creates a humorous backdrop to   a   story of desire and restraint in a   very   retro,   very   transnational  ,   19  60s Hong Kong.        Mr. Chow and Mrs. Chan     eat steak dinners as well as   traditional dishes, and get their accessories from Japan.   Characters are constantly on the move between Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, Cambodia, the Philippines and the USA, and filming took place partly in Thailand.   However, the framing of Hong Kong as a hub of transnational activity is distinctly set in the past.   Mrs.   Chang's   endless supply of qipao dresses     and Mr. Chow's persistent   smoking at the typewriter in a Western business suit all contribute to   the captivating     retro-nostalgic aesthetic  .           In the Mood for Love    is   often cited as one of the first in     a wave of Hong Kong-Chinese   coproductions   with W  estern countries (in this case, France), that would garner critical and   commercial   success among Western audiences.   However, u  nlike o  ther 'crossover' films   it is not of the W  uxia (Martial Arts)   genre.  In the Mood for Love  uses a cinematographic register of international commercial art cinema and is more comparable to films such as  Amelie      (J  ean Pierre   Jeunet   2001)  .     Having won prizes at awards ceremonies around the world, i  n 2016    In the Mood for Love      was     named the second-best film of the 21  st   century after  Mulholland Drive    (David Lynch 2001) by a g  roup of 177 critics for the BBC.     Definitely worth a watch!           BMC Cultural Exchange are putting on a free screening of In the Mood for Love at Quilliam   Brothers’ Teahouse in Newcastle upon Tyne on Wednesday February 5  th   2017   at 7.30pm.         See our  Facebook  events page for more details.            
 
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Explore Chinese culture through film!

BMC are putting on a free screening of In the Mood for Love (dir. Wong Kar-wai, 2000) to celebrate the end of Spring Festival. 

Read our review of this wonderful film here. 

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